Standorte des BLMK

Cottbus (CB)

Dieselkraftwerk

Uferstraße/Am Amtsteich 15
03046 Cottbus Deutschland
Tel: +49 355 4949 4040
Öffnungszeiten:

dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 19 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Alle Ausstellungsräume, der Veranstaltungssaal und das mukk. sind über Aufzüge barrierefrei zu erreichen.

Frankfurt (Oder) (FF)

Packhof

Carl-Philipp-Emanuel-Bach-Straße 11
15230 Frankfurt (Oder) Deutschland
Tel: +49 335 4015629
Öffnungszeiten:

dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 17 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Die Ausstellungsräume sind barrierefrei: Besuch bitte nur mit Begleitperson.

Frankfurt (Oder) (FF)

Rathaushalle

Marktplatz 1
15230 Frankfurt (Oder) Deutschland
Tel: +49 335 28396183
Öffnungszeiten:

dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 17 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Die Ausstellungsräume sind barrierefrei über eine Rampe erreichbar: Besuch bitte nur mit Begleitperson.

Leonhard Sandrock

Von der Flüchtigkeit des Lichts

1907 bis 1933 – Industrie und Arbeitswelten im postimpressionistischen Blick

 

16/03—26/05/24

 

The monographic exhibition is dedicated to the work of the painter Leonhard Sandrock (born 1867 Neumarkt/Silesia, died 1945 Berlin). Apart from a small prologue that shows natural scenes that are laid out in an almost typical impressionistic manner, the 100 paintings, motifs and subjects presented, some of which are rooted in realism, reflect the industrialization of the 19th century and its aesthetic and socio-economic effects on the changed everyday life of the early days of the 20th century. The exhibition is divided into three thematic chapters that focus on specific groups of motifs: ships, harbors and seas form the main part, followed by depictions of locomotives, wagons, tracks and train stations. Other groups of works focus on heavy industry production sites with images of blast furnaces etc.

 

On the one hand, Sandrock’s oeuvre stands in the tradition of impressionistic open-air painting of the Barbizon school of the late 19th century. On the other hand, his paintings are just as clearly characterized by the principles of realism that developed at the same time. In his late work, however, trace elements of New Objectivity influences can be seen. However, what is essential to his work is the consistent artistic reflection on the image-worthiness of industry and depiction of work.

 

In the second half of the 19th century, which was characterized by industrialization and the associated economic boom, the rapid development of large cities in Europe also increased. On the one hand, the number of German metropolises grew enormously in the period 1870 – 1900, but on the other hand, their population numbers also increased, because the large cities were the culmination points of that structural, social and economic change.

 

However, not only in Germany, but also in England, Belgium, the Netherlands and especially France, the themes of industrialization and the then modern city were reflected in art. The aesthetic (perceptual) changes in everyday life that resulted from new speeds of locomotion, electrification and technology exerted an almost magical attraction for artists, as did the changed scale between man and machine. A certain fascination, which was not always free from criticism, continued to lie in the effects and framework conditions, but also the possibilities that industrialization brought with it on the reality of living and working.

 

Industrialization not only offered an interesting range of topics for all forms of artistic expression, but technical developments also revolutionized art and the understanding of art itself. Especially in the visual arts, the invention of tube paint and photography changed enormously both the craftsmanship and technical image production possibilities, and above all the image worlds and concepts.

 

THE EXHIBITION DESIGNED BY BLMK IS A COOPERATION WITH THE MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF WORMS IN ANDREASSTIFT AND WAS MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE FRIENDLY SUPPORT OF SABATIER GALERIE & KUNSTHANDEL GMBH, VERDEN (ALLER).


Ships, ports and seas

 

Maritime subjects characterize an extensive body of work in Leonhard Sandrock’s painterly oeuvre. In his main creative years between the turn of the century and the early 1930s, he devoted himself largely to the artistic view of industrial worlds, the depiction of work and, again and again, seascapes, marine images and harbor views.

 

In the last years of the 19th century, the expansion of the German navy was immensely intensified due to the arms race with England and the imperialist colonial interests of Wilhelm II. “Germany’s future lies at sea,” the Kaiser announced in 1896, and with the so-called fleet amendment of 1900, the navy became the core of Germany’s rearmament policy. The emperor’s great interest promoted an enormous popularization of everything maritime, which was reflected, among other things, in fashion, in the mass media and in artistic production of these years.

 

The change that took place around 1900 from traditional seafaring to highly industrialized modern ship and armaments production, which was intended to ensure connections between the Empire and the colonies, became a central theme in Sandrock’s work. Several of the artist’s paintings illustrate this paradigm shift by powerfully depicting the contrast between a romanticized view of the world of tall ships and the simultaneous fascination for modern ocean shipping.

 

In his seascapes, maritime paintings and numerous harbor views, Leonhard Sandrock creates a productive synthesis between the two diametrically opposed directions of art. On the one hand, following the maxims of his teachers and role models, he strives for precise attention to detail and incorporates his countless sketches and extensive knowledge of technical developments into each of his works. On the other hand, it was less nature and more the technology of old sailing ships, modern steamships or large-city industrial areas that gave him the preferred opportunity to break away from the actual motif of the picture and develop a free, painterly conception in the spirit of the French Impressionists.

 

The light begins to shimmer above the horizon lines of his mostly dark seascapes and in the smoke of the steam engines, the constructive contrast between technical forms and natural phenomena advances into a colorful and dramatic modern scenario. The large steamships invade the world of sailing boats, cutters and sloops with powerful images, and the romantic world of traditional seafaring is displaced by the economic pressure of the present and its prosperous technology. Numerous pictures by Leonhard Sandrock capture this turning point in an almost dramatic way. They draw attention to the situation of industrial and dock workers, which is becoming increasingly evident

The shadows of the steel colossuses and factories that dominate the image move in. Sandrock’s fascination with modernity also becomes a subtle analysis of changing work realities and social conditions at the beginning of the 20th century.


Locomotives, wagons and stations

 

The development of rail transport set the pace for industrialization and at the same time was one of the strongest symbols of the progress of industrial modernity. The railway changed the experience of time and space for those who used it, allowing people to reach increasingly distant destinations in ever shorter times. This increase in mobility had an impact on the relationship between the city, suburbs and the countryside, as both commuters and weekenders recognized the advantages of rail transport. The consequences were not only noticeable in the flourishing tourism industry in the regions served by the railway. Rather, the railway also facilitated urbanization, as all kinds of goods, food and industrial goods could be transported more easily between the city, industrial suburbs and rural areas, as well as (working) people being able to commute. This change took place in less than half a century.

 

When Émile Zola demanded in his 1890 novel „The Beast Within“ that “Our artists must find the poetry of train stations as their fathers found that of forests and rivers,” the railway had already become an integral part of everyday life. With a few exceptions, however, locomotives, trains and train stations played a subordinate role in the motif world of painting until then, although William Turner had already done so in 1844 with his picture “Rain, Steam and Speed” and Claude Monet in the late 1870s with his paintings of railways in the snow or the Argenteuil train station founded a tentative iconographic tradition.

 

Leonhard Sandrock’s paintings, which are dedicated to the range of themes relating to railways and train stations, focus less on the experience of speed than, for example, William Turner’s early work. Rather, on the one hand, he is interested in certain aesthetic phenomena, such as the lights of trains running at night or individual points of light from signaling systems, which seem to have found their almost natural place in the light structure of the evening or dawn. And on the other hand, Sandrock’s gaze gets caught up in the presentation of the functional benefits of the railway. In these images, the physical appearance, i.e. the form of the gigantic machine, dissolves in its own steam.