Standorte des BLMK

Cottbus (CB)

Dieselkraftwerk

Uferstraße/Am Amtsteich 15
03046 Cottbus Deutschland
Tel: +49 355 4949 4040
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dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 19 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
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Frankfurt (Oder) (FF)

Packhof

Carl-Philipp-Emanuel-Bach-Straße 11
15230 Frankfurt (Oder) Deutschland
Tel: +49 335 4015629
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dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 17 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
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Frankfurt (Oder) (FF)

Rathaushalle

Marktplatz 1
15230 Frankfurt (Oder) Deutschland
Tel: +49 335 28396183
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dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 17 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Die Ausstellungsräume sind barrierefrei über eine Rampe erreichbar: Besuch bitte nur mit Begleitperson.

Ludwig Rauch, Kubiak & Rauch

Of Wondrous Creatures and Landscapes

16/06/—01/09/24

 

The exhibition, which consists of almost 40 works, combines works by the artist duo Kubiak & Rauch, which were created between 1992 and 2004, with newer pictures by Ludwig Rauch.

 

In 1999, works by Kubiak & Rauch were shown for the first time as part of a group exhibition at the BLMK, then still the Brandenburg Art Collections. 25 years later – the artist duo has long since disbanded – the current exhibition takes up certain threads of art history, image development and an artist’s biography.

 

In the 1990s, far ahead of their time, Johannes Ulrich Kubiak (born 1961 in Annaberg-Buchholz, lives and works in Antwerp) and Ludwig Rauch (born 1960 in Leipzig, lives and works in Berlin) developed layering and montage processes that, starting from photography, enabled unlimited variability in the development of motifs and thus led to an image form that oscillates between graphic and photographic appearance with painting principles. The photographic source material was converted into a form of light painting, the depth of which could not have been achieved with conventional image production techniques in either photography or painting. Looking back, these complex image production concepts and techniques can be understood as a kind of analog anticipation of Photoshop.

 

In these images, the boundaries of disciplines and forms of expression not only blur, but also merge with and into one another. The result is a fictional or imaginary scene of realities as structures of set pieces and assembled, apparently homogeneous images, which, however, never conceal their fault lines. Rather, these are lines that constitute the image and are always a sign, almost a symbol, of its non-linearity. Motifs and subjects from different Ludareas are combined to create a kind of playful surrealism with a partly baroque feel. The reference to classical art and visual history is not only evident in terms of iconography, but the content repertoire also alludes to the great, fundamental questions of humanity in history: nature, architecture and the human body (as well as their connection as the basis of human existence).

 

Ludwig Rauch’s more recent works take up collage and montage techniques that have been used in the visual arts since the early 20th century, but also in literature and music. To do this, the artist uses digital possibilities and relies exclusively on specially photographed image material to compose his poetic, real, yet unreal-seeming image worlds that alternate between abstract and representational. Photography thus becomes a type of painting with other means.