Standorte des BLMK

Cottbus (CB)

Dieselkraftwerk

Uferstraße/Am Amtsteich 15
03046 Cottbus Deutschland
Tel: +49 355 4949 4040
Öffnungszeiten:

dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 19 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Alle Ausstellungsräume, der Veranstaltungssaal und das mukk. sind über Aufzüge barrierefrei zu erreichen.

Frankfurt (Oder) (FF)

Packhof

Carl-Philipp-Emanuel-Bach-Straße 11
15230 Frankfurt (Oder) Deutschland
Tel: +49 335 4015629
Öffnungszeiten:

dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 17 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Die Ausstellungsräume sind barrierefrei: Besuch bitte nur mit Begleitperson.

Frankfurt (Oder) (FF)

Rathaushalle

Marktplatz 1
15230 Frankfurt (Oder) Deutschland
Tel: +49 335 28396183
Öffnungszeiten:

dienstags bis sonntags
11 bis 17 Uhr

Sonder­öffnungs­­zeiten an Feier­tagen
Eintrittspreise

Die Ausstellungsräume sind barrierefrei über eine Rampe erreichbar: Besuch bitte nur mit Begleitperson.

Christa Jeitner

Beim Eigentlichen ankommen

 

25/02—02/06/24

 

While recent exhibitions have focused on the textile collages of the Brandenburg artist Christa Jeitner (born 1935 Berlin), this cabinet exhibition focuses on her graphic work from the 1950s to the 1980s. The line as a fundamental element of graphic expression as well as all the resulting variations shape her artistic development across genres. For her, drawing never means depicting an object in detail, but rather penetrating an idea to which she responds with her own artistic means.

 

Jeitner began her studies in 1954 with a focus on book illustration at the University of Fine and Applied Arts in Berlin-Weißensee. After her exmatriculation in her first year of study, she took private lessons with the painter Harald Kauffmann. In 1956 she continued her studies in graphics, painting, textile design and art history in West Berlin, but was unable to complete them due to the construction of the Wall.

 

The free sheets and cycles created during the early years of the GDR impress with their reduced drawing gestures, which clearly understand the essence of an object – the real thing. In her early brush and pen drawings, Jeitner succeeds in giving gestures, postures and facial features a remarkable expressiveness using a few, often seemingly fragile lines. The line of her medieval architectural drawings is similarly reserved, but clearly more specific, and she (de)constructs them almost anatomically with their essential, geometric components. Excessiveness was to be avoided; the reduction to the outline is seen as a commitment to modernity.

 

Jeitner devotes her drawings to her cultural interests. As a student, she goes to the Berlin State Opera to sketch and focuses her attention on the singers‘ movements and costumes. She creates sensitive and caricaturing book illustrations for literary stories and poems by Jean Giono, Christian Morgenstern and Wladimir Majakowski. She feels particularly connected to the writer Johannes Bobrowski, who reflects the relationship of Germans to Eastern Europe in his works. Touched by his poems, the artist processes the crimes of German National Socialism against Jews on paper and in textiles.

 

After a break from drawing for several years, Jeitner found a new task in the 1980s with the old town center of Bernau, which was being demolished. She captures the visualization of what will be absent in the future in an almost documentary manner and with rapid, expressive lines. The focus is on ruins and relics, which in their former form so naturally shaped the (urban) landscape and people’s lives.

 

“The actual remains what is perceived, which wants to be made visible as experienced truth,” is Jeitner’s mission to herself. But the experienced truth can only be your very personal one. For the artist, “arriving at the real thing” also means arriving at yourself.